Tikanga Matatika, the dapaanz Code of Ethics, was released in April 2020. In 2022 and 2023 we developed an education programme to support members to deepen their understanding of Tikanga Matatika. We share a video and some of the resources below.

If you are a member you can also participate in the education programme in the member-only area of our website

All members of dapaanz are held to this code.

Our Pou Whakarae, Takurua Tawera, notes that “Tikanga Matatika is our response to the Treaty of Waitangi – it is underpinned by tikanga Māori and reflects the growing diversity of our workforce.

Under Tikanga Matatika, practitioners maintain their professional and clinical knowledge, but they begin to use it in different ways. For example, concepts of ‘support,’ ‘protection’ and ‘empowerment’ are still there, but when you use them under the korowai of a word like ‘manaaki’ you’re expressing common concepts from a Māori world view and that allows Māori whānau to feel included.

Addiction, as we know, is the result of a number of issues that a person encounters in their life, notes Takurua. He explains further: “The intent of Tikanga Matatika is to consider the mental, spiritual and emotional part of that person’s experience rather than going straight to the clinical aspects associated with addiction.

Importantly, the Code allows and encourages whānau to be included and their mana enhanced.

The Code purposefully ensures that practitioners are sensitive to the culture and wider world that the person who comes into a clinical relationship with them, comes from; whether they be Māori, Chinese, Pakeha or whatever.

We want to see more fluency from a cultural perspective regardless of which culture we are talking about.”

Download Tikanga Matatika

All members of dapaanz are held to this code.

Our Pou Whakarae, Takurua Tawera, notes that “Tikanga Matatika is our response to the Treaty of Waitangi – it is underpinned by tikanga Māori and reflects the growing diversity of our workforce.

Under Tikanga Matatika, practitioners maintain their professional and clinical knowledge, but they begin to use it in different ways. For example, concepts of ‘support,’ ‘protection’ and ‘empowerment’ are still there, but when you use them under the korowai of a word like ‘manaaki’ you’re expressing common concepts from a Māori world view and that allows Māori whānau to feel included.

Addiction, as we know, is the result of a number of issues that a person encounters in their life, notes Takurua. He explains further: “The intent of Tikanga Matatika is to consider the mental, spiritual and emotional part of that person’s experience rather than going straight to the clinical aspects associated with addiction.

Importantly, the Code allows and encourages whānau to be included and their mana enhanced.

The Code purposefully ensures that practitioners are sensitive to the culture and wider world that the person who comes into a clinical relationship with them, comes from; whether they be Māori, Chinese, Pakeha or whatever.

We want to see more fluency from a cultural perspective regardless of which culture we are talking about.”

Download Tikanga Matatika